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Watch This Officer Pull A Suicidal Subway Jumper Back From The Brink Of Death

An MBTA Transit Police detective’s quick thinking saved a man’s life, Transit Police said.

A surveillance camera at the Park Street T station shows a man walking toward the yellow line in front of the subway track pit. And just as the man is about to take a fatal step onto the tracks, a detective grabs and pulls him back onto the platform.

Boston Globe reports:

Sean Conway, the detective, was searching for a suspect in the Red Line’s Park Street Station when, he said, he noticed something unusual.

The detective sprang into action.

He showed the man his badge and tried to talk to him, he said in an interview Thursday afternoon.

“I said to him ‘Step back, you’re going to get hurt,’ ” said Conway. “But from the way he was acting, I knew this wasn’t your average disturbance.”

Once the man, who was in his 40s, spotted Conway, he took another swig from the bottle and attempted to jump into the pit.

The next train was due to arrive in just four minutes. But the more immediate threat came from the third rail and its instantly fatal 600 volts of electricity that is positioned directly underneath the passenger platform at that location, Transit Police said.

“Without Detective Conway’s work, this man likely would have been electrocuted,” said Transit Police Chief Paul MacMillan on Thursday. “We’re very proud of him.”

The unnamed would-be jumper was taken to a local hospital. Before leaving the hospital, the thanked Conway for saving his life.

 


Jerome Hudson

Managing Editor

Jerome Hudson has written for numerous national outlets, including The Hill, National Review, and The Atlanta Journal-Constitution and was recognized as one of Florida’s emerging stars, having been included in the list “25 Under 30: Florida’s Rising Young Political Class.” Hudson is a Savannah, Ga. native who currently resides in Florida.

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