Please disable your Ad Blocker to better interact with this website.

  • Ford Stumples: America’s Premier, Next-Gen Carrier Just Got Demolished In New Report

    Ford-class aircraft carrier USS Gerald R. Ford has just gone $2 billion over its initial budget and still suffers from unreliable technology, according to a new Government Accountability Office report.

    In 2007, GAO discovered that the costs for the USS Gerald R. Ford were underestimated, a finding which continues to hold true. But despite poor planning, approval was granted, and the Ford-class program has constantly been beset with delays, cost overruns, and underdeveloped technology. Tests of important technology are behind schedule. Due to unreliable systems, it’s unclear whether the Gerald R. Ford can achieve aircraft launch and recovery rates. The total cost is set at $12.8 billion dollars.

    The ship is nothing short of an expensive disaster, and what has taken place with the CVN-78 threatens to repeat with the USS John F. Kennedy (CVN-79).

    The CVN-79 is supposed to cost less than the Ford, though it is still expected to exceed current projections. According to GAO, even now it’s a little too late to make course corrections.

    GOP Sen. John McCain did not win out on the battle to cordon off $100 million of spending for the CVN-79, the second ship part of the overall program. McCain first wanted the Pentagon to certify that the CVN-79 had undergone shock and blast tests, and while his language was included in the conference version of the National Defense Authorization Act, also mentioned is the fact that the defense secretary can issue a waiver.

    Additionally, although the maximum cost limit for the aircraft carrier was lowered to $11.4 billion from $11.5, there still is a waiver available to bump up to the higher limit if performance is sacrificed.

    Congress will have the opportunity to scrutinize cost overruns. Under section 121 of the conference bill, the Navy has to issue quarterly reports documenting any change that adds $5 million to the cost of the Ford class. But reports aren’t the only form of oversight. Both the Navy secretary and chief of naval operations have to personally approve each $5 million overrun and verify that it is a necessity. They are prohibited from delegating the approval process to subordinates.

    “The experiences of the Ford-class program are not unique—rather, they represent a typical acquisition outcome,” the report noted. “The cost growth and other problems seen today were known to be likely in 2007—before a contract was signed to construct the lead ship. Yet CVN 78 was funded and approved despite a knowingly deficient business case; in fact, the ship has been funded for nearly 15 years. It is too simplistic to look at the program as a product of a broken acquisition process; rather it is indicative of a process that is in equilibrium.”

    Follow Jonah Bennett on Twitter

    Content created by The Daily Caller News Foundation is available without charge to any eligible news publisher that can provide a large audience. For licensing opportunities of our original content, please contact licensing@dailycallernewsfoundation.org.

    Content created by The Daily Caller News Foundation is available without charge to any eligible news publisher that can provide a large audience. For licensing opportunities of our original content, please contact licensing@dailycallernewsfoundation.org.

    Powered by WPeMatico


    Surge Wire

    Breaking news and analysis from around the globe courtesy of Daily Surge.

    Join the discussion. Leave a comment.

    We have no tolerance for comments containing violence, racism, vulgarity, profanity, all caps, or discourteous behavior. Thank you for partnering with us to maintain a courteous and useful public environment where we can engage in reasonable discourse.





    Trending Now on Daily Surge

    Send this to a friend