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  • EPA Warning: Holiday Leftovers Contribute to Climate Change

    Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently posted a video on its website warning Americans to be mindful about how much food they waste during the holiday season if they want to help save the planet.

    The EPA claims in the video posted on YouTube and in the text accompanying it that food waste contributes to climate change.

    “Most people don’t realize how much food they throw away every day — from uneaten leftovers to spoiled produce,” the EPA website states. “More than 96% of the food we throw away ends up in landfills.”

    The video, posted on Dec. 16, is part of the EPA’s “Fight Food Waste” campaign.

    “Once in landfills, food breaks down to produce methane, a potent greenhouse gas which contributes to climate change,” the caption states. “So, this holiday season, take steps to cut down your food waste.”

    A family sitting down for a holiday meal in the video.

    “Before sitting down with friends and family this holiday season, consider the impact your meal can have on our planet,” the video states. “A typical American family of four throws out $1,600 of wasted food each year. It ends up in landfills where it rots and releases methane – a greenhouse gas 20 times more potent than carbon dioxide that contributes to climate change,” the narrator states while an image of a savage storm is shown.

    “So this holiday season, buy only what you need,” the video concludes. “Donate your extra food to food banks and shelters and compost the trimmings.”


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